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Encanto (2021)

The tale of an extraordinary family, the Madrigals, who live hidden in the mountains of Colombia, in a magical house, in a vibrant town, in a wondrous, charmed place called an Encanto. The magic of the Encanto has blessed every child in the family—every child except one, Mirabel. But when she discovers that the magic surrounding the Encanto is in danger, Mirabel decides that she, the only ordinary Madrigal, might just be her exceptional family's last hope.
4.8 / 5
INCLUVIE SCORE
4.3 / 5
MOVIE SCORE
Representation
Black
Latinx
Women
Multiracial

Incluvie Movie Reviews


Daleyna
December 8, 2021
5 / 5
INCLUVIE SCORE
4 / 5
MOVIE SCORE

'Encanto': Colorful Characters, Intergenerational Trauma, and Fun Music

Encanto is Disney’s newest animated musical about the family Madrigal who live in the mountains of Colombia in a magical casita. Each family member receives a magical gift. However, everything isn’t as perfect as it seems. The protagonist Mirabel (Stephanie Beatriz) is the only Madrigal child without a gift. When she discovers the miracle is dying, Mirabel sets out to fix it and prove her worth to her family. Spoilers ahead! I loved Encanto, especially the ethnic and racial diversity. It’s the most I’ve ever seen in an animated movie. Skin tones range from the darkest of black to pale white, all within a single community of Colombians. It made me so happy to see such a colorful community and family like my own. Latine families are some of the most diverse because the Latine ethnicity is typically made up of a genetic combination of European, African, and Indigenous. The ratios of those races can vary, leading to a wide range of skin tones, eye colors, hair textures, etc. Latines can be white, black, and brown. In the Madrigal family alone, all of these different skin tones and racial identities are represented. It’s amazing representation for Latines. Some family members are Afro-Latinos like Tío Félix (Mauro Castillo) and Antonio (Ravi Cabot-Conyers). Others are white like Tía Pepa (Carolina Gaitán) and Agustín (Wilmer Valderrama). Some have straight hair like Isabela (Diane Guerrero), while others have curly hair like Mirabel. And each and every one of them is beautiful. What’s more, this movie has body diversity. Every woman and man is shaped differently, the standout being Luisa (Jessica Darrow), the super buff, gorgeous older sister of Mirabel. (I think there could still be more body diversity, particularly among the women, since the animation still tends to make them skinny, but I digress.)  The music in Encanto gets better and better the more you listen to it. The animated musical sequences at first were a little jarring. In Mirabel’s song “Waiting on a Miracle” everything freezes, which I didn’t quite like because I wasn’t sure what was a fantasy versus what was Mirabel’s reality. Other musical sequences occasionally felt childish, however I understand that’s because I’m an adult, and this is still a Disney family film directed at kids.  While most songs aren't instantly catchy, they're all super fun to listen to! My top three favorites were “Surface Pressure,” “We Don’t Talk About Bruno,” and “Dos Oruguitas.” Luisa’s song “Surface Pressure” is a tribute to all elder sisters everywhere who’ve had to carry their family burdens. It’s very catchy, and Jessica Darrow gets to show off her amazing vocal range. Arguably the best song in the film is “We Don’t Talk About Bruno.” It puts Lin-Manuel Miranda’s talents on display, featuring a stacked verse in which all of the characters sing over each other, a staple of musical theatre and Miranda’s work. 
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Movie Information


The tale of an extraordinary family, the Madrigals, who live hidden in the mountains of Colombia, in a magical house, in a vibrant town, in a wondrous, charmed place called an Encanto. The magic of the Encanto has blessed every child in the family—every child except one, Mirabel. But when she discovers that the magic surrounding the Encanto is in danger, Mirabel decides that she, the only ordinary Madrigal, might just be her exceptional family's last hope.

Rating:
Genre:Animation, Comedy, Family, Fantasy
Directed By:Byron Howard, Jared Bush
Written By:Jared Bush, Charise Castro Smith
In Theaters:11/24/2021
Box Office:$253,000,000
Runtime:102 minutes
Studio:Walt Disney Pictures, Walt Disney Animation Studios

Cast