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Free Guy (2021)

Overview

A bank teller called Guy realizes he is a background character in an open world video game called Free City that will soon go offline.
3.7
INCLUVIE SCORE
4.5
MOVIE SCORE

Incluvie Movie Critiques


Alex Arabian
September 28, 2021
4
INCLUVIE SCORE
4.5
MOVIE SCORE

Free Guy's Marxist Parallels To John Carpenter's They Live

Shawn Levy's Free Guy is one of the most refreshingly optimistic and cynical-free blockbusters to come out in the past two decades. Even the conflicts within its story — frustratingly abundant Disney corporation references be damned — are relatively stress-free and enjoyable to watch, begetting worthy parables and moral lessons through to the happily-ever-after ending, wherein the characters of both worlds, digital and "real," experience dystopias and utopias of their own making, with Free Guy resembling an almost anarcho-communist utopia free of any capitalistic underpinnings preventing its people from reaching their full potential. Interestingly, the film They Live, a thematic companion piece to Free Guy, features a setting of the virtual opposite, but with the same revolutionary spirit. At first glance, one wouldn't think John Carpenter's cult classic would be a thematic double-billing — or that Free Guy would be worthy of being mentioned in the same sentence as They Live — but the two films of vastly different genres have more similarities upon further examination.
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Daleyna
August 15, 2021
3.5
INCLUVIE SCORE
4.5
MOVIE SCORE

'Free Guy' Is the Ryan Reynolds, Disney Collab I Never Knew I Needed

Spoilers ahead for Free Guy Free Guy, Disney’s new movie about a video game NPC who realizes he’s living in a video game, is a treat! Its base is classic Disney — a white heteronormative love story. But its toppings — Ryan Reynolds’ unique brand of adult humor, a commitment to exploring modern day video game culture, and tons of star cameos — make this movie fun to watch!  Free Guy’s main protagonists are all white, heteronormative characters, per usual. This story could have had so much potential for great representation if even one of the leads had been non-white. Yet again, POC are relegated to supporting roles. Guy’s best friend is Buddy (Lil Rey Howery), a fearful security guard. Howery is hilarious here, playing a very similar character to his role in Get Out. While he is great as comic relief, he also has one of the most touching moments in the movie when he gives a speech to Guy about how, even if they are fake, the moments they share together are real. Buddy should have been given more to do than serve as Guy’s motivator and fall into the black best friend trope.  Mouser (Utkarsh Ambudkar) is another comedic character and the friend to Keys (Joe Keery). Guy and Buddy and Keys and Mouser are meant to be parallels of each other since Keys himself created Guy, so that means we get two sets of white male protagonists and their POC best friends! However, Mouser seems much less like a best friend than Buddy. But Ambudkar does amazing in this role, and it was great to see him so soon after finishing season 2 of Never Have I Ever where he played the cool teacher. He also should have been given more to do than act as Antoine’s lackey and Keys’ friend. We don’t even see too much of him being Keys’ friend anyway, making his line “Keys is my boy,” feel a bit cheap, but the movie unfortunately isn’t interested in giving him much depth beyond that. 
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Pictures and Videos


Movie Information


A bank teller called Guy realizes he is a background character in an open world video game called Free City that will soon go offline.

Rating:PG-13
Genre:Comedy, Action, Adventure, Science Fiction
Directed By:Shawn Levy
Written By:Zak Penn, Matt Lieberman
In Theaters:8/13/2021
Box Office:$324,000,000
Runtime:115 minutes
Studio:Berlanti Productions, 21 Laps Entertainment, Maximum Effort, Lit Entertainment Group

Cast