‘WandaVision’ in Color: Spoiler-Free Recap of Episode 3

Allison DeGrushe
Allison DeGrushe
March 7, 2021

“We just don’t know what to expect!

Though Disney+ dropped a two-episode premiere of Marvel’s original miniseries WandaVision last week, we didn’t learn much. Fans of the MCU were thrown head-first into this production without so much as an explanation. There’s no context as to what is going on, and the show is leaving viewers confused and questioning every little thing.

However, as the streaming service dropped another episode this past Friday, audiences are raving. Not only is this the first episode in full color, but it illustrates a more distinct picture of what might be taking place.

Episode 3, titled “Now in Color,” brings us to the 1970s — a decade full of vibrancy, color, and total mayhem. The third episode, directed by Matt Shakman and written by staff writer Megan McDonnell, takes inspiration from American sitcoms The Brady BunchThe Mary Tyler Moore Show, and Good Times.

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Like the previous episodes, this one presents Wanda (Elizabeth Olsen) and Vision (Paul Bettany) trying to conceal their powers and adjust to a suburban lifestyle in Westview. Also, it picks right up from when we last saw the pair — Wanda is pregnant. Now, if you’re a comics fan like me, you already know about this story-line; if not, you can learn more here.

The core of the episode lies in Wanda . As long as she is pregnant, her powers act on their own accord. However, because of her telekinetic abilities, the stages of pregnancy are sped up. In this episode, Wanda and Vision are left scrambling as they face immediate labor.

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We also see quite a lot of Geraldine (Teyonah Parris) in this episode, which is a drastic change from her limited introduction. It seems she has fully adapted to the 70s, sporting quite the historically-accurate attire like the rest of the cast.

I won’t say much else because I want everyone to experience this episode without any prior knowledge, but I will say this: prepare to be confused! There are plenty of twists and turns incorporated in this episode that will blow your mind and leave you thinking, “What just happened?”

Overall, this episode is the best one yet. The representation in this episode was incredible — from central female characters to people of color, Marvel is more inclusive than ever. Also, there were many subtle hints that point to what might really be going on in this “reality” of some sort.

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Elizabeth Olsen showcased her talent beautifully in this episode, exhibiting several emotions in a matter of minutes. Her portrayal as Wanda Maximoff is brilliant, and I can almost see this series acting as her villain origin story, which I am so here for. It’s what us Marvel nerds deserve — comic accuracy!

Although I wasn’t a big fan of Vision in the movies, he’s starting to grow on me in this show. Paul Bettany displays humanistic traits in his role as the superhero, which I am loving. For me, he is the primary source of humor because of how he learns to conform to a rural way of life — he struggles, messes up, and does his best to have fun.

Though it is interesting to see Vision this way, it isn’t him; he is usually on top of everything, immediately sensing when things aren’t right. Viewers get momentary glimpses of the real Vision in the show as he slowly starts to point out the aberrant nature of his life. He doesn’t remember anything, so what is going on? Is this really Vision, or an imitation of him?

Well, I guess we’ll have to wait and see.

The first three episodes of WandaVision are now streaming exclusively on Disney+. Catch new episodes premiering every Friday — trust me, you don’t want to miss it.